In March 2016, We Celebrate Women’s History Month

Throughout history, women have driven humanity forward on the path to a more equal and just society, contributing in innumerable ways to our character and progress as a people.  In the face of discrimination and undue hardship, they have never given up on the promise of America:  that with hard work and determination, nothing is out of reach. – President Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States

In honor of National Women’s History month, the fast-growing family history site, Archives.com, published a visual infographic to honor some of the exceptional women who have made a difference and helped shape our world. In this blog post, I include the top 5 inspirational quotes these women have left behind:

5.Marie Curie Womens History month Celebration on John Slifkos Civil Society Blog site“Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood.” – Marie Curie, Polish physicist and chemist 

The importance of Marie Curie’s work is reflected in the numerous awards bestowed on her. She received many honorary science, medicine and law degrees and honorary memberships of learned societies throughout the world. Together with her husband, she was awarded half of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903, for their study into the spontaneous radiation discovered by Becquerel, who was awarded the other half of the Prize. In 1911 she received a second Nobel Prize, this time in Chemistry, in recognition of her work in radioactivity. She also received, jointly with her husband, the Davy Medal of the Royal Society in 1903 and, in 1921, President Harding of the United States, on behalf of the women of America, presented her with one gram of radium in recognition of her service to science. – Source: nobleprize.org

4.Harriet Beecher Stowe Womens History Month 2016 on John Slifkos Civil Society blog“Common sense is seeing things as they are; and doing things as they ought to be.” – Harriet Beecher Stowe, American abolitionist and author 

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) published more than 30 books, but it was her best-selling anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin which catapulted her to international celebrity and secured her place in history.

But Uncle Tom’s Cabin was not Stowe’s only work. Her broad range of interests resulted in such varied publications as children’s text books, advice books on homemaking and childrearing, biographies and religious studies. The informal, conversational style of her many novels permitted her to reach audiences that more scholarly or argumentative works would not, and encouraged everyday people to address such controversial topics as slavery, religious reform, and gender roles.  Harriet Beecher Stowe believed her actions could make a positive difference. Her words changed the world. – Source: harrietbeecherstowecenter.org/

3.Jane Austen celebrating Womens History Month 2016 on John slifkos civil society blog site“One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.” – Jane Austen, English novelist 

Jane Austen is a world renowned English author and, despite her having lived centuries ago, she commands a legion of fans around the world numbering in the millions today. Her timeless works- numbering just six completed novels- have been turned into a plethora of motion pictures, television shows and modern adaptations at a regular pace in addition to being translated into multiple languages that help her stories surpass cultural boundaries. These six works have gone on to become the model formula for the romance stories of today. – Source: www.janeausten.org

2. Susan B. Anthony Celebrating Womens History Month 2016 on John Slifkos Civil Society blog site“Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.” – Susan B. Anthony, Civil rights leader and suffragette

Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906) is perhaps the most widely known suffragist of her generation and has become an icon of the woman’s suffrage movement. Anthony traveled the country to give speeches, circulate petitions, and organize local women’s rights organizations. Stanton and Anthony founded the American Equal Rights Association and in 1868 became editors of its newspaper, The Revolution. The masthead of the newspaper proudly displayed their motto, “Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less.” From 1881 to 1885, Anthony joined Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gage in writing the History of Woman Suffrage. As a final tribute to Susan B. Anthony, the Nineteenth Amendment was named the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. It was ratified in 1920. – Source: www.nps.gov

1. Eleanor_Roosevelt_celebrating women's history month march 2016 on John Slifkos civil society blog site“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” – Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady and humanitarian 

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was the longest-serving First Lady throughout her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s four terms in office (1933-1945). She was an American politician, diplomat, and activist who later served as a United Nations spokeswoman.  When Mrs. Roosevelt came to the White House in 1933, she understood social conditions better than any of her predecessors and she transformed the role of First Lady accordingly. She never shirked official entertaining; she greeted thousands with charming friendliness. She also broke precedent to hold press conferences, travel to all parts of the country, give lectures and radio broadcasts, and express her opinions candidly in a daily syndicated newspaper column, “My Day.”

This made her a tempting target for political enemies but her integrity, her graciousness, and her sincerity of purpose endeared her personally to many–from heads of state to servicemen she visited abroad during World War II. As she had written wistfully at 14: “…no matter how plain a woman may be if truth & loyalty are stamped upon her face all will be attracted to her….” –Source: www.whitehouse.gov 

In conclusion, (and in the words of President Obama): “During Women’s History Month, we remember the trailblazers of the past, including the women who are not recorded in our history books, and we honor their legacies by carrying forward the valuable lessons learned from the powerful examples they set.”